Yorkshire Terrier

The Yorkshire Terrier is a small dog breed of terrier type, developed in the 19th century in the county of Yorkshire, England, to catch rats in clothing mills, also used for rat-baiting. The defining features of the breed are its maximum size of 7 pounds (3.2 kg) and its gray, black, and tan coat. The breed is nicknamed Yorkie and is placed in the Toy Terrier section of the Terrier Group by the Federation Cynologique Internationale and in the Toy Group or Companion Group by other kennel clubs, although all agree that the breed is a terrier. A popular companion dog, the Yorkshire Terrier has also been part of the development of other breeds, such as the Australian Silky Terrier. Coat For adult Yorkshire Terriers, importance is placed on coat colour, quality, and texture.[1] The hair must be glossy, fine, straight, and silky. Traditionally the coat is grown-out long and is parted down the middle of the back, but "must never impede movement."[2] From the back of the neck to the base of the tail, the coat should be a dark gray to a black color, and the hair on the tail should be a darker black. On the head, high chest, and legs, the hair should be a bright, rich tan, darker at the roots than in the middle, that shades into a lighter tan at the tips. Also, in adult dogs, there should be no dark hairs intermingled with any of the tan colored fur. A Yorkshire Terrier puppy, 4 weeks old, displaying the characteristic black/steel black and tan coat. Adult Yorkshire Terriers that have other coat colours than the above, or that have woolly or extra fine coats, are still Yorkshire Terriers. The only difference is that atypical Yorkshire Terriers should not intentionally be bred.[3] In addition, care may be more difficult for "woolly" or "cottony" textured coats, or coats that are overly fine.[1] One of the reasons given for not breeding "off-coloured" Yorkies is that the colour could be a potential indicator of a genetic defect that may affect the dog's health, a careful health screening can clarify if any health risks exist.[4] [edit]Puppy coats A newborn Yorkshire Terrier puppy is born black with tan points on the muzzle, above the eyes, around the legs and feet and toes, the inside of the ears, and the underside of the tail. Occasionally yorkies are born with a white "star" on the chest or on one or more toes. Also, a few Yorkies are born with a red tint in their coat, but that is only when the parents also have this trait. It is also common to find white pat

h on one or more nails.[5] These markings fade with age, and are usually gone within a few months. It may take three years or more for the coat to reach its final color. The final color is usually a black/grayish colour.[6] P. H. Combs, writing in 1891, complained about show wins awarded to puppies, when the dog's coat does not fully come in until three or four years old, "and the honor of winning such a prize (for a puppy) can therefore be of but little practical benefit to the owner" since the adult dog's color cannot be exactly predicted. [7] [edit]Hypoallergenic coats Main article: Hypoallergenic dog breed The typical fine, straight, and silky Yorkshire Terrier coat has also been listed by many popular dog information websites as being hypoallergenic. In comparison with many other breeds, Yorkies do not shed to the same degree, only losing small amounts when bathed or brushed.[8] and it is the dog's dander and saliva that trigger most allergic reactions.[9] Allergists do recognize that at times a particular allergy patient will be able to tolerate a particular dog, but they agree that "the luck of the few with their pets cannot be stretched to fit all allergic people and entire breeds of dogs."[10] The Yorkshire Terrier coat is said to fall out only when brushed or broken, or just said to not shed.[11] Although neither of those statements agree with what biologists, veterinarians, and allergists know about dog fur, allergists "think there really are differences in protein production between dogs that may help one patient and not another",[10] meaning that some allergic people may not have allergic reactions to a specific dog, like the Yorkie. [edit]Coat care Owners may trim the fur short for easier care. For shows, the coat is left long, and may be trimmed to floor length to give ease of movement and a neater appearance. Hair on the feet and the tips of ears can also be trimmed.[1][2] The traditional long coat is extremely high maintenance. To prevent breakage, the coat may be wrapped in rice paper, tissue paper, or plastic, after a light oiling with a coat oil. The oil has to be washed out once a month and the wraps must be fixed periodically during the week to prevent them from sliding down and breaking the hair. Elaborate coat care dates from the earliest days of the breed. In 1878, John Walsh described similar preparations: the coat is "well greased" with coconut oil, the dog is bathed weekly, and the dog's feet are "carefully kept in stockings."