The Saarloos Wolfdog

The Saarlooswolfhond traces its origins to the efforts of a Dutch breeder in 1921. Dutch breeder Leendert Saarloos started crossbreeding a German Shepherd male to a female Mackenzie Valley Wolf (Canis lupus occidentalis). He aimed for an improved version of the German Shepherd which would be immune to canine distemper. He succeeded insofar that the Saarloos wolfdog is known today as a strong imposing breed that has kept its wolflike characteristics; it is cautious, reserved and lacks the ferocity to attack. It is not, however, the dog that Leendert Saarloos hoped to get, as nearly all the first generation hybrids succumbed to distemper. Until Leendert Saarloos died in 1969, he was in full control over the breeding of his "European Wolfdog". The Dutch Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1975. To honor its creator they changed the name to "Saarloos Wolfdog". In 1981 the breed was recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI). Some Saarloos Wolfdogs have been trained as guide dogs for the blind and as rescue dogs. The Saarloos wolfdog (Dutch: Saarlooswolfhond) is an established breed of a wolfdog hybrid.In 1921, Dutch breeder Leendert Saarloos started cross-breeding a German Shepherd Dog male to a female Mackenzie Valley Wolf (Canis lupus occidentalis). Although he was passionate about the German Shepherd, he found most dogs to be too "domestic" and wanted to breed in more natural properties in order to get better working dogs. The result wasn't entirely what Mr. Saarloos hoped for. This breed is cautious, reserved and lacks the ferocity to attack. Until Leendert Saarloos died in 1969, he was in full control over the breeding of his "European wolfdog". The Dutch Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1975. To honour its creator they changed the name to "Saarloos Wolfdog". In 1981 the breed was recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI). In the past, some Saarloos wolfdogs were trained as guide dogs for the blind and as

rescue dogs, but most dogs of this breed are currently kept as "family dog". [edit]Size & Appearance The Saarloos wolfdog is a fairly large dog, up to 76 cm at the shoulder and weighing up to 40 kg. It is an athletic dog in build, with medium bone, and a strong and muscular body. They move lightly on their feet and have an elegant march. Its coat is short and dense, providing good protection from the weather. There are 3 colours; wolf-grey / red / white. Because the wolf-grey genes are dominant, this is the most common colour. Genes for white colour are recessive, making this uncommon although this colour is accepted. The Saarloos has wolf-like expressions, as well as a wolf-like head. [edit]Ownership Due to its size and strength, the Saarloos wolfdog is only recommended for experienced dog owners. Most owners have at least two Saarloos to provide the necessary pack, because the animals are still pack-oriented. The breed is very intelligent. Isolation intensifies anti-social behavior, and these dogs will panic if locked in an enclosed space. It should not be owned by those inexperienced with this breed, as the Saarloos wolfdog requires a passionate and dedicated owner/handler. Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) is an international federation of kennel clubs based in Thuin, Belgium. The English language translation, World Canine Organisation, is not often used. Its goals are described in Article 2 of their regulations: The aims of the F.C.I. are to encourage and promote breeding and use of purebred dogs whose functional health and physical features meet the standard set for each respective breed and which are capable of working and accomplishing functions in accordance with the specific characteristics of their breed; to protect the use, keeping and breeding of dogs in the member countries; to support free exchange of dogs and cynological information between member countries and initiate the organization of exhibitions and tests.