Mythology

In mythology, dogs often serve as pets or as watchdogs.[189] In Greek mythology, Cerberus is a three-headed watchdog who guards the gates of Hades.[189] In Norse mythology, a bloody, four-eyed dog called Garmr guards Helheim.[189] In Persian mythology, two four-eyed dogs guard the Chinvat Bridge.[189] In Philippine mythology, Kimat who is the pet of Tadaklan, god of thunder, is responsible for lightning. In Welsh mythology, Annwn is guarded by Cwn Annwn.[189] In Judaism and Islam, dogs are viewed as unclean scavengers.[189] In Christianity, dogs represent faithfulness.[189] In Asian countries such as China, Korea, and Japan, dogs are viewed as kind protectors. Welsh mythology is the mythology of the Welsh people. It consists partly of folk traditions developed in Wales, and partly of traditions developed by Britons elsewhere before the end of the first millennium. Some of this contains remnants of the mythology of pre-Christian Britain, surviving in much altered form in medieval Welsh manuscripts such as the Red Book of Hergest, the White Book of Rhydderch, the Book of Aneirin, and the Book of Taliesin. The prose stories from the White and Red Books are known as the Mabinogion, a title given to them by their first translator, Lady Charlotte Guest, and also used by subsequent translators. Poems such as Cad Goddeu (The Battle of the Trees) and mnemonic list-texts like the Welsh Triads and the Thirteen Treasures of the Island of Britain, also contain mythological material. These texts also include the earliest forms of the Arthurian legend and the traditional history of post-Roman Britain. Other sources include the 9th century Latin historical compilation Historia Britonum (the History of the Britons) and Geoffrey of Monmouth's 12th century Latin chronicle Historia Regum Britanniae (the History of the Kings of Britain), as wel

as later folklore, such as The Welsh Fairy Book by W. Jenkyn Thomas [1908]. Welsh history, before the Romans, was learned orally by the Druids on fifteen-year apprenticeships. Due to invasions by many, including the Romans and Saxons, history and mythology are confused due to the lack of written sources. The Chinvat Bridge [?inva:t] (Avestan Cinvato Peretum, "bridge of judgement" or "beam-shaped bridge"[1]) in Zoroastrianism is the bridge which separates the world of the living from the world of the dead. All souls must cross the bridge upon death. The Bridge's appearance varied depending on the observer's asha, or righteousness. As related in the text known as the Bundahishn, if a person had been wicked, the bridge would appear narrow and the demon Vizaresh would emerge[2] and drag their soul into the druj-demana (the House of Lies), a place of eternal punishment and suffering similar to the concept of Hell.[3] However, if a person's good thoughts, words and deeds in life were many, the bridge would be wide enough to cross, and the Daena, a spirit representing revelation, would appear and lead the soul into the House of Song. Those souls that successfully cross the bridge are united with Ahura Mazda. Often, the Chinvat Bridge is identified with the rainbow, or with the Milky Way galaxy, such as in Professor C.P. Tiele's "History of Religion ".[4] However, other scholars such as C.F. Keary and Ferdinand Justi disagree with this interpretation, citing descriptions of the Chinvat Bridge as straight upward, rather than curvilinear.[5][6] Three divinities were thought to be guardians of the Chinvat Bridge: Sraosha (Obedience), Mithra (Covenant) and Rashnu (Justice).[7] Alternate names for this bridge include Chinwad, Cinvat, Chinvar or Chinavat.[8] The concept of the Chinvat bridge is similar to that of the As-Sirat in Islam.